Pulitzer-winning author Philip Roth dies at 85, says agent

(Reuters) – Author Philip Roth, who was both hailed and derided for laying bare the neuroses and obsessions that haunted the modern Jewish-American experience, died on Tuesday at the age of 85, his agent said.

Roth died in New York City at 10:30 p.m. local time of congestive heart failure, his literary agent Andrew Wylie said.

Roth wrote more than 30 books, including the 1991 memoir “Patrimony,” which examined his complex relationship with his father and won the National Book Critics Circle Award.

In his later years, Roth turned to the existential and sexual crises of middle age, never abandoning his commitment to exploring shame, embarrassment and other guilty secrets of the self, although usually with a heavy dose of humor.

After more than 50 years as a writer, Roth decided that 2010’s “Nemesis,” the story of a polio epidemic in the Newark, New Jersey, neighborhood where he grew up, would be his last novel. He then went back and reread all his works “to see whether I’d wasted my time,” he said in a 2014 interview published in the New York Times Book Review.

For his conclusion, he quoted Joe Louis, the heavyweight boxing champion of the 1930s and ‘40s: “I did the best I could with what I had.”

In 2017, he published “Why Write?,” a collection of essays and non-fiction works written between 1960 and 2013.

Roth’s best-known work was the 1969 novel “Portnoy’s Complaint,” a first-person narrative about Alexander Portnoy, a young middle-class Jewish New Yorker. The book featured several notorious masturbation scenes and a narrator who declared he wanted to “put the id back in yid.”

Roth’s first published book was the 1959 novella and short-story collection “Goodbye, Columbus,” which won the National Book Award. Several of his novels, including “Zuckerman Unbound,” “The Ghost Writer” and “The Anatomy Lesson”, feature Nathan Zuckerman, a character who came to be seen as Roth’s fictional alter ego.

Roth liked to play with the distinctions between fact and fiction, often writing about neurotic novelists and even naming some characters “Philip.” Yet he was frequently annoyed and amused by readers’ desire to project the real Roth onto his characters.

Although his novels often explored the Jewish experience in America, Roth, who said he was an atheist, rejected being labeled a Jewish-American writer.

“It’s not a question that interests me. I know exactly what it means to be Jewish and it’s really not interesting,” he told the Guardian newspaper in 2005. “I’m an American.”

Some critics said Roth’s novels exposed him as a self-hating Jew who played on negative stereotypes or generally cast Jews in a bad light. He would recall the hostile reception at a symposium at New York’s Yeshiva University in 1962 as the “most bruising public exchange of my life.”

FILE PHOTO – Author Philip Roth poses in New York September 15, 2010. REUTERS/Eric Thayer/File Photo

MULTIPLE HONORS

Roth won the Pulitzer Prize for 1997’s “American Pastoral,” which examined the impact of the 1960s on a New Jersey family. He was the first three-time winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award, honored for “Operation Shylock” in 1994, “The Human Stain” in 2001 and “Everyman” in 2007. Roth also received the National Medal of Arts at the White House in 1998.

Philip Milton Roth was born on March 19, 1933, in Newark, New Jersey. The son of an insurance salesman, Roth earned a bachelor’s degree at Bucknell University and a master’s degree in English from the University of Chicago. He dropped out of the doctoral program in 1959 to write film reviews for the New Republic before “Goodbye, Columbus” came out.

Roth taught comparative literature, mostly at the University of Pennsylvania. He retired from teaching in 1992 as a distinguished professor of literature at New York’s Hunter College.

Roth had a long relationship with British actress Claire Bloom but their five-year marriage ended in divorce in 1995. A year later, she published a bruising memoir, “Leaving a Doll’s House,” in which she portrayed him as depressed, remote, self-centered and verbally abusive.

Roth had been especially prolific in the years leading to his 2012 retirement from writing, turning out novels nearly every two years. His more recent books included 2001’s “The Dying Animal” and “The Human Stain,” published in 2000 and released in 2003 as a movie starring Anthony Hopkins and Nicole Kidman.

“The Plot Against America,” published in 2004, imagines what would have happened had flying ace Charles Lindbergh, an isolationist who expressed anti-Semitic views, defeated Franklin Roosevelt in the 1940 election and signed a peace accord with Adolf Hitler.

Following the death of several friends, including novelist Saul Bellow in 2005, Roth wrote “Everyman,” a short work of fiction about the physical decline and death of a successful advertising executive.

Roth was considered a difficult interview subject and told the Guardian he disliked discussing his books. “You should let people fight with the books on their own and rediscover what they are and what they are not.”

Roth said the act of writing for him is “filled with fear and loneliness and anxiety.” But, he added: “There are some days that compensate completely. In my life I have had, in total, a couple of months of these completely wonderful days as a writer, and that is enough.”

In a New York Times interview in 2018, Roth reflected on his 50-plus years as a writer, describing it as: “Exhilaration and groaning. Frustration and freedom. Inspiration and uncertainty. Abundance and emptiness. Blazing forth and muddling through.”

Slideshow (2 Images)

(This story corrects spelling of Louis’s surname in 6th paragraph and Bucknell in 15th paragraph.)

Reporting by Eric Beech; Editing by Bill Trott, Diane Craft and Nick Macfie

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Reuters: Entertainment News

Paddock 2.0? Man Claiming to Be Federal Agent Found in Hotel With Arsenal & Psych Meds

hotel

Waikiki, HI – After a man’s social media posts were flagged by the FBI, a tip to the Honolulu Police resulted in officers finding a large cache of loaded weapons during a welfare check at his hotel room.

Hawaii News Now reported that the FBI alerted local authorities to “suspicious” social media posts in which a person was claiming to be a federal agent. The specific contents of the messages or how the FBI was initially alerted has not been made public.

In an email regarding the incident, the Honolulu Police Department stated:

“HPD officers responded to a report of a suspicious male in Waikiki yesterday. The male was located and taken to a hospital for evaluation, where he remains. No charges have been filed at this time.

Investigators recovered the man’s belongings, which included firearms and knives. HPD and FBI investigators are continuing to work on this case, and no further information is being released at this time.”

Strangely, the 38-year-old man reportedly told law enforcement that he was on a mission hunting terrorist cells, according to Hawaii News Now.

The arsenal of weapons found in the man’s possession included:

  • An AR-15, and 15 high-capacity magazines—all loaded.
  • A shotgun and two handguns.
  • A total of more than 800 rounds of ammunition, plus body armor, camouflage, masks and 18 military-style knives.

While weapons were subsequently found to be legally owned by the man, and having them in his hotel room did not violate any laws, the suspect was put on a psychiatric hold after police reportedly found psychiatric medication in his room, which allowed them to confiscate the firearms until a mental health evaluation had been performed.

“There was no danger,” said Mike Dailey, manager at the hotel. “The gentleman was here. He was a guest staying here. He left and then there was an FBI and police investigation.”

“He had a room here and they’re looking at the stuff in his room,” Dailey added. I don’t know that there are any weapons. I think you’ll have to talk to the police about that.”

The man is reportedly a local resident who has lived in Waikiki for 3 years. Police sources claim that he said he brought the weapons and ammunition to his hotel room over the course of a few days. Law enforcement took him to a local hospital for a mental health evaluation; where, if deemed mentally fit, his weapons could be returned.

Oddly, the scene in the hotel room sounds eerily similar to that of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, which is still shrouded in mystery—the Las Vegas massacre at the Mandalay Bay Hotel in October 2017.

Since the attack on Oct. 1, there has been a consistent lack of transparency that has raised questions as to whether some type of cover-up was ongoing. Legitimate inquiry into the attacks has reportedly been shut down at the highest levels, and high-ranking FBI officials in Washington have been accused of working to conceal the information.

The FBI’s “official” narrative goes something like this: suspect Stephen Paddock was a mysterious lone wolf gunman. He was a mystery man and habitual gambler who snapped, bought guns, and shot up a music festival—and no one knows why.

This massive cover-up involves the FBI attempting to hide the fact that they have evidence that the election of President Trump was a catalyst for the radicalization of Paddock—and that other persons of interest could potentially be involved in the massacre.

The rabbit hole is deep.

More recently, on March 25, a man named Francho Bradley—who also claimed to be on a secret government mission—was arrested by Tewksbury Police following a search of his hotel room that uncovered a massive cache of firearms, including an AR-15 with a bump stock, other rifles, handguns, 3 silencers, ammunition, smoke grenades, flash bangs, a rocket launcher, cellular phones and even satellite phones—much of equipment that would be needed to conduct a black-op shooting in the vein of the Las Vegas shooting.

After being given consent to search the hotel room by Bradley, a detective found three parking tickets from Cambridge Street at Anthem Street and Second Street. According to the police report, detectives believed that Bradley may have been out surveilling the area:

As I entered back into the hotel room, Offficers McMahon and Adams stood by with Francho. I entered the room and saw parking tickets from Cambridge at Athenaeum Street and Second Street. Two of the tickets were at the same exact location two days apart and the third was from an area a short distance away on a third day. I found this to be odd because according to Francho’s statements prior he had no ties to Boston or Cambridge but he kept receiving parking tickets. Based on his frequent trips from Cambridge to Tewksbury and arsenal of weapons, my suspicions grew that he may be surveilling an area. It should be noted that I knew there was a major demonstration “March for Our Lives” in Boston that day.”

Perhaps not so coincidentally, Bradley is deeply immersed in the U.S. national security apparatus, as evidenced by a report from Heavy.

While these three events could be completely unrelated, they seem to share some very interesting similarities and are most certainly worth further investigation.

DASH cryptocurrency and The Free Thought Project have formed a partnership that will continue to spread the ideas of peace and freedom while simultaneously teaching people how to operate outside of the establishment systems of control like using cryptocurrency instead of dollars. Winning this battle is as simple as choosing to abstain from the violent corrupt old system and participating in the new and peaceful system that hands the power back to the people. DASH is this system.

DASH digital cash takes the control the banking elite has over money and gives it back to the people. It is the ultimate weapon in the battle against the money changers and information controllers.

If you’d like to start your own DASH wallet and be a part of this change and battle for peace and freedom, you can start right here. DASH is already accepted by vendors all across the world so you can begin using it immediately.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

The Free Thought Project

Deadly nerve agent found in Somerset|Humor

The nerve agent used to attack former Russian spy Sergi Skripal and his daughter may have links to a substance being developed in Somerset, revealed Home Secretary Amber Rudd today. An amber liquid found near the scene of the attack has now been traced back to the garden shed of Taunton taxi drivers Alf and Reg Perkins.

‘The cloudy liquid found in the Perkins’ shed and the nerve agent are almost certainly linked’ revealed an MI6 operative. ’They both give off a foul, acrid smell and share the same apple based signature. There are also the remains of an as yet unidentified mammal floating on top, it has to be more than just coincidence’.

‘Being found slumped on a bench in the park is a dead giveaway’, continues the operative. ‘That’s  how it affects all those who come into contact with it. We’ve seen it many times before. To anyone not used to it, the liquid is almost certainly lethal and with even small doses,  the side effects last for days’.

The liquid, with the code name ‘Old Ratcatcher’, was also found in the restaurant where the couple ate and was even being sold in pubs and restaurants across the south west region.
The cloudy, apple based nerve agent produced by the Perkins brothers is said to seriously alter speech patterns, causing temporary or long term blindness, loss of bodily functions and severe migraine. It also triggers vomiting and nausea, shaking, bouts of violence followed by self loathing and eventually leads to those affected developing blotchy skin and a big, red bulbous nose.
Side effects experienced by those affected by the nerve agent are also said to include expressing unremitting love for one another and repeatedly claiming you are their best friend.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

NewsBiscuit

‘He interests Czechs’ — May mates cautious media attack on Corbyn undercover agent promises (Online video media)

UK Prime Minister Theresa May unleashed a zinger at Prime Minister’s Questions, making the mildly witty observation that Corbyn normally asks for the Government to spend money… adding “I know he likes Czechs.”

The Labour Leader responded with a mock yawn.

May’s attempt at humor was referencing recent accusations that Corbyn had provided intel to a Czechoslovakian spy in the 80s, on the day-to-day activities of Margaret Thatcher among other things.

The PM’s comments come as the news broke that Corbyn’s lawyers are demanding a donation to charity and an apology from Tory party vice-chairman Ben Bradley, relating to claims he tweeted that the Labour leader “sold British secrets to communist spies.”

The tweet has since been deleted after pressure from Corbyn’s legal team.

Czech out the rest of the PMQs below:

The Sun published claims by a former Czech agent — Jan Sarkocy — that Corbyn was an asset named ‘Agent Cobb’ during the Cold War. Sarkocy told the paper that he met Corbyn on several occasions, including in the House of Commons.

Sarkocy’s allegations came under increased scrutiny after he alleged Corbyn would keep him posted on Margaret Thatcher while he was a backbencher in the ‘80s.

Svetlana Ptacnikova, director of the Czech security service archive, denied that Corbyn was or had been a paid agent. Ptacnikova told the BBC that their files indicated that Corbyn was seen as a potential contact, but he was not catalogued as an informant.

Theresa May previously addressed the allegations, stating: “It’s for individual members of parliament to be accountable for their actions in the past,” she said.

“Where there are allegations of this sort, members of parliament should be prepared to be open and transparent.”

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

Let’s block ads! (Why?)


RT UK News

A travel agent is trying to charge fees for sunbeds

IN KEEPING with the trend for charging for things travellers used to get free, it should perhaps come as no surprise that sunbeds are the latest feature of a standard holiday on which travel agents are slapping extra fees. Thomas Cook, a British package-holiday firm, has announced that it will allow holidaymakers to pre-book poolside loungers for £22 ($ 31) per person. Six days before the start of a trip, travellers will get an email offering them the chance to reserve specific sunbeds. The booking tool will include a map that allows people to see where the sun will shine at various times of day. The experiment will start in late February at three hotels on the Canary Islands and will expand to 30 hotels this summer. 

To some holidaymakers, this will seem like yet another attempt by the travel industry to get money from every source possible. Airlines, for instance, made $ 82bn in add-on fees last year alone, according to IdeaWorksCompany, a research firm. Over the past few years, both full-service and low-cost airlines have introduced…Continue reading

Business and finance

Mueller booted FBI agent off Russian election meddling probe over 'anti-Trump texts' – reports

Robert Mueller removed an FBI agent from his investigation into alleged Russian election meddling, people briefed on the matter told US media. The move came after the Justice Department began probing whether the agent had sent anti-Trump text messages.

Mueller, the special counsel examining alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, removed FBI agent Peter Strzok from the investigation over the summer, according to The New York Times. He was reportedly reassigned from the investigation to the FBI’s human resources department, a move which is largely seen within the bureau as a demotion.

Three sources told the Times that the catalyst was the discovery of text messages in which Strzok reacted to news events – including presidential debates – in ways that could be deemed critical of Donald Trump. The text message exchange was between Strzok and FBI lawyer Lisa Page, another member of Mueller’s team, according to The Washington Post. Strzok and Page, who were engaged in an extramarital affair at the time, reportedly wrote disparaging comments about Trump and appeared to favor Hillary Clinton, according to sources cited by the Post.

“Immediately upon learning of the allegations, the special counsel’s office removed Peter Strzok from the investigation,” said Peter Carr, a spokesman for the special counsel’s office, as quoted by the Times. Page left Mueller’s team weeks before news of the text messages broke, Carr added.

Meanwhile, the inspector general’s office at the Justice Department said the incident is part of a wider probe into how the FBI has handled investigations relating to the election. It said the office is “reviewing allegations involving communications between certain individuals, and will report its findings regarding those allegations promptly upon completion of the review of them.” A spokeswoman at the Justice Department said “we are aware of the allegation and taking any and all appropriate steps.” The Justice Department inquiry into Strzok is being conducted by inspector general Michael E. Horowitz, who is also leading a broad examination into how the FBI handled the Clinton email probe.

Read more

US President Donald Trump and Michael Flynn © Jim Lo Scalzo / Carlos Barria

The precise content of Strzok’s text messages is unknown, and it remains unclear whether Horowitz will make them public. However, the FBI does allow its agents to express opinions “as an individual privately and publicly on political subjects and candidates.”

Current and former law enforcement officials who worked with Strzok – who remains assigned to the FBI’s human resources department – told the Times that they are unaware of any incidents in which the agent allowed his political views to influence investigations. They said he was deeply trusted by former FBI director James Comey, and he would have likely become one of the FBI’s top officials if issues had not been raised surrounding the text messages. Although Strzok’s departure from the investigation was reported by ABC News in August, the reason behind the move was unclear until now.

Meanwhile, Mueller continues to lead the investigation into alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, despite a complete lack of evidence that Russia interfered in the process in any way. Trump has called the probe a “witch hunt,” while Russian President Vladimir Putin has said the accusation is the result of Clinton’s supporters not wanting to admit the Democratic candidate has only herself to blame for losing the election.

“They are absolutely reluctant to admit this, and prefer to delude themselves and others into thinking it was not their fault, that their policy was correct, they did all the right things, but someone from the outside thwarted them. But it was not so. They just lost and they have to admit it,” Putin told French newspaper Le Figaro in May. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)


RT US News

Clinton CIA Director James Woolsey: Mueller’s Agent of Deception in Flynn Case

The hottest stories from Newsbud.com in this weekly roundup, plus a sneak peak of what’s to come, and major announcements. Sign up today and join the community for access to exclusive content only available at Newsbud.com.

*Follow us here at Newsbud Twitter

**Subscribe here at BFP-Newsbud YouTube Channel

***Newsbud on Vimeo

Show notes

Newsbud.com

Subscribe

Donate

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Newsbud